An Noor
El Telegraph
George Saleeba
Family Business and Community
Longing to belong
Salem Coming to Australia
Denise Baraki Mack’s story
Edward Haikal
Digital Storytelling: Migrant Memories
AN NOOR Published monthly by Lebanese Publications Melbourne
The second wave of migrants from Lebanon, who started coming out in the late 1940s, were to have a major impact on the Lebanese community in Melbourne.  They attended the few Lebanese community organisations that were already in existence such as St Nicholas Orthodox Church in east Melbourne and Jimmy Khyatt’s club in Lonsdale Street, Melbourne as well as visiting the homes of the first wave migrants.
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George Saleeba, Thornbury
George Saleeba was born in Rashaya, Lebanon in 1882 and came to Australia with his father Essa at the age of 10 years in 1892. George did not attend school in Melbourne but was thrust into earning a living at an early age to enable the rest of his family in Lebanon to join them.  In common with all other first wave immigrants, Essa and George became hawkers of clothing and softgoods in country areas outside of Melbourne.  
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Longing to Belong
I arrived to Melbourne from Lebanon with my mother and younger brother in October 1976. We escaped the Lebanese Civil War and joined my older brother and sister who were already living in Australia. I was a teenager eager to get on with my life and make the most of the opportunities available in this new country. 
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Salem Coming to Australia
I am honored and proud to share with you my early experiences in Australia. I was born 1945 in Kab – Elias Lebanon about 15 kilometres from Zahleh city in the Bekaa valley. Growing up in a middle class family of seven, I attended the Anglican school until the 3rd year high school, studying the Arabic and English languages. I joined the Lebanese army at the age of 18 and then decided to migrate to Australia at the age of 21 years.
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Edward Haikal
Edward Haikal came home one day in 1967 and asked us, his five children, who would like to live in Australia? The answer was 'I' unanimously, not just from the children but also from his wife and mother-in law. 
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Digital Storytelling:
Migrant Memories
A series of short video stories celebrating the stories of immigration and settlement of Australian Lebanese.
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El-Telegraph Newspaper

‘To be a good Lebanese you have first to be a good Australian’.

That creed has been the constant editorial theme of the El- Telegraph newspaper since its inception in 1970.

Thirty years ago there were few communication services available to the Arabic speaking community. There were no regular Arabic radio programs, and Arabic newspapers, which took 4 days to arrive, were too removed geographically and emotionally from Australia to adequately express the local community’s desire for a spirit of belonging.
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Family, Business and Community: Australian-Lebanese in Victoria

The Lebanese presence in Australia evolved over three waves of migration which spanned 120 years. The first wave extended from the 1880s to the outbreak of the First World War. The second was part of Australia’s great post World War Two migration, and the third, a direct result of the Civil War in Lebanon, took place between 1976 and 1990.

During the 1880s a number of Lebanese settled in Victoria and, by the turn of the nineteenth century, almost 1000 Lebanese-born and their children lived in that state. In 2001 the total Australian-Lebanese and their descendants living in Melbourne is estimated at 40,000.
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Denise Baraki Mack’s story

‘One day, my habibi, when you are far away from here, you will remember that a man can no more forget his father and grandfather than a river can forget its source.’

When two Aborigines meet for the first time they ask, ‘What is your Dreaming?' – Who are you, who is your family?

To experience the absence of a Dreaming is both powerful and devastating. Deprived of their Dreaming a person has no tribal identity, no connectedness, no belonging. Family roots are as important as the spirit of the land.
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