News & Events

Not Quite White: Lebanese and the White Australia Policy
by Dr Anne Monsour

ALHSV was privileged to host the Melbourne launch of Dr Anne Mansour’s book Not Quite White: Lebanese and the White Australia Policy at the Northcote Town Hall on Sunday 13 March, 2011.  Anne’s book was based on her PhD research into Lebanese families mainly in Queensland and some in New South Wales.  As the title indicates, Anne’s focus was on Colonial and Federal Governments’ attitudes and actions towards the Lebanese migrants, the responses of these migrants and their settlement experiences.  Her deep knowledge of the subject became apparent when she responded to specific questions about particular families.   People were left with an appreciation of the courage, tenacity and diligence of these first wave Lebanese immigrants as they and their families made their way in their new country often in the face of official opposition.

Not Quite White Not Quite White
Not Quite White Not Quite White

The second part of the program was devoted to an introduction by Dr Trevor Batrouney to a recently published book: On Being Lebanese in Australia: Identity, Racism and the Ethnic Field co-authored by Dr. Paul Tabar, Dr. Greg Noble, and Dr. Scott Poynting.  Dr Batrouney gave the following appreciation of this work:

Not Quite White Not Quite White
Not Quite White Not Quite White

“The authors have made an outstanding contribution to our understanding of Lebanese in Australia and, more generally, of the migrant experience. They have achieved this by incorporating in this book a blend of social theory and examination of practices and experience of different groups of Lebanese in Australia… The authors’ analyses range across the experiences and attitudes of Lebanese in different situations and activities. These include the Shi’ite ceremony of Ashura; the dabki (a Lebanese dance); the use of language by Lebanese young people, in particular the word habiib… In each of each these chapters we hear authentic Lebanese voices which illustrate in highly personal terms the major themes of the book.”

 

 

back Home ...